Archive for the ‘Domaining’ Category

Make Offer Domain Marketplace Strategy

There are numerous strategies and plenty of discussion on whether to list domain names for sale with a BIN price vs make offer or even if it is beneficial to have domains listed for sale at marketplaces or with landing pages at all.

In this post I want to drill down specifically into make offer listings. Many investors choose to have a percentage or all domains in their portfolios listed for sale with “make offer”. It sounds pretty simple, a potential customer lands on a domain or marketplace listing and sees a make offer. As a seller at most marketplaces and landing page templates allow you to set the minimum offer price you’re willing to let potential buyers offer. Setting a minimum offer price helps sellers keep from dealing with constant low offers on liquid or premium domains.

I am curious about strategies used domain owners when setting minimum offer for different types of names in their portfolio or if minimum offers are set the same across a whole portfolio? There are several benefits to setting a lower make offer minimum (under $500) and likely some disadvantages too.

Obvious advantages for domains getting low minimum offers in marketplaces are that at least it shows buyers later on that the domain has received offers previously and is a desirable name. Also, depending on where received an offer usually comes from an identifiable IP address and/or email address which can help the seller figure out who is interested in purchasing the name.

On the flip side, if sellers are expecting at least five figures for a domain, by having a minimum offer of say $10k this will weed out all of the “tire kickers” and give the potential buyer an idea of the sellers expectations. With a background in sales I personally think this gives you less of a chance to pitch and sell the domain to potential buyers that aren’t ready to come to the table with that high of an offer. With a higher minimum offer you may also have it so high that the potential buyer may think that the minimum offer is the sales price and when they finally get the courage to offer that much and get a response that is 5x – 10x on top of that it may discourage them as well. Of course, ultimately the price is the price and eventually the buyer and seller will figure out if the deal is going to happen or not.

What are your thoughts or strategies on setting a low, high or tailored minimum offer for domains in your portfolio?

Brandpa Shares First Year Stats

Brandpa.com is a brandable domain marketplace that recently completed its first full year selling domains. Similar in operation to BrandBucket, Brandpa accepts domain submissions and if accepted charges the owner to list the domain. Once accepted a domain will be listed in the Brandpa marketplace with a logo and if sold a commission is charged. Many domain investors have seen favorable results from listing on Brandpa, there is a lengthy discussion on NamePros that is a good read for those who may be interested in submitting domains.

During their first year Brandpa claims their sell thru rate is 6.6% with higher conversion rates on names 5 characters or less. Of the domains sold over 50% were with average sale price between $2,000 – $4,000. The total number of domains listed on the platform grew from  779 to 2,674. The marketplace has been growing at a rapid pace, over the last year weekly submissions have gone from only 100 a week to nearly 2,000 a week as of March, 2018. Once submitted, it takes an average of approximately one week to get the domain appraised and accepted or rejected and another (approx) 7 days to get the domain live once the domain name servers have been assigned to Brandpa. See Brandpa’s 1st year blog post for all of the stats shared.

I have not yet submitted any names to Brandpa, although I am encouraged by the feedback from other domain investors and may try it out. My biggest apprehension about using the marketplace are the strict terms of service which demand exclusivity. Even For 30 days after you remove your domain from the site, Brandpa still claim rights to the commission of any sale outside of its marketplace. That being said, it is important to get eyeballs on brandable domains and it seems Brandpa is doing a good job of that.

What Are Domainers and Domain Companies Buying?

The Domains Wanted section at NamePros forum sure has been interesting lately.

I’ve used the domains wanted section to make several purchases and blogged about my experience acquiring domains there. I always figured it’s a given, on the domain forum you expect domainers to look for cheap deals, no domain investor ever wants to pay “end user pricing.” That being said there are some funny posts the last few weeks by several members that are titled something like this:  I will buy killer one word, two word, LLL or LLLL .com ONLY if you are extremely DESPERATE for money and have no other options!!

Lol..we get it…you want to buy names cheap, who doesn’t?  So, should every serious domain investor flood the domain wanted section or blogs with this kind of post?  Or should buyers continue posting the types of names they want buy with their budget?  A big part of successful domaining is finding and negotiating a good deal, these posts seem lazy in my opinion but there’s a sucker born every day I guess.

My favorite current thread is by domain broker Andrew Rosener of Media Options, they are enthusiastically trying to fill a portfolio with domains from every year starting in 1987-2017.

I am looking to buy at least one domain name from both years: 1990 & 1991

I really don’t care about the quality of the domain. 

The WHOIS data must show the original registration date.

I’ll pay a fair price. Probably more than anyone else would pay. Budget is between $1,000 and $100,000 (depends on the domain of course!).

I am completing a portfolio which includes a domain name from every year except 1986 (will take one of those too if you happen to find one!), 1990 and 1991. 

1987: ksr.com
1988: cli.com
1989: murphy.com 
1990: ? (insert: OpusTech.com)
1991: ? (insert: Aracor.com)
1992: ins.com
1993: pwl.com
1994: impala.com
1995: bigjohnson.com
1996: kettle.com
1997: backflip.com
1998: flawless.com
1999: axp.com
2000: vvr.com
2001: loro.com
2002: lare.com
…and so on and so on…

Almost complete, (UPDATE: portfolio is now complete) the portfolio was missing domains from years 1990 and 1991 but since posting yesterday MO has purchased OpusTech.com which has a registration date of 8-30-1990.  The whois does show MediaOptions as the new owner and domaintools.com also lists it for sale at $15,000 which is likely still lingering from the previous owner.  In the post it is also mentioned that he will buy a 1986 domain if you can find one.  There are 6 domains registered in 1985 and 53 registered in 1986*, most look like they are in use but I didn’t check any.

Besides aged and premium .COM names there is a lot of demand for Brandable and pronounceable 5-7 letter .COMs, and several LLLL (four letter) .com requests with many of them also looking for pronounceable patterns.  Cryptocurrency and Weed/Pot/Cannabis and Advertising/Tech domains seem to get a lot of requests in the domain wanted section at NamePros recently as well.

So, if you have some good domains, investors are buying…and they are still only paying reseller prices in most cases. Good luck and happy hunting/selling!

*source 100 oldest domain names

NamePros Closing in On 1,000,000 Members

NamePros.com is the largest domain name forum online and has been around since 2003.  Over the last 13 years it has seen a couple of ownership changes, several upgrades/updates and along the way it has picked up 999,975 members (as of this morning).  Goes to show how much the domain naming industry is really growing.

For me, NamePros has been more than just a great place for discussion, reading and research but also offers a large and active domain marketplace.  Over the last 2-3 years I have also noticed NamePros really getting in tune with the rest of the industry.  By adding a very active blog and social media presence, I now see more and more key industry players posting and participating on NamePros.  It really is evolving into a complete domain community and NP and all of its moderators should be proud.

Of course, any forum reaching 1,000,000 members is worth celebrating.  NamePros and friends ran a contest (already closed) and are set to give away some cool prizes soon including NamesCon tickets and advertising packages for the member who guesses the right date/time of the 1,000,000th sign up.  Looks like it will happen in the next day or two! Big congrats and thanks much to NamePros for building and maintaining such a great community.

Current forum stats (as of 5.16.2017 @ 8:15 MST):

Discussions: 1,018,748
Posts: 6,153,785
Members: 999,975

Click HERE to see NP members lists including most posts, most points, notable, top members, staff and representatives

Poll: Will Liquid ChiPs Continue To Dip in 2016?

2016 is flying by and we are getting closer to expiration dates on many different type of ChiPs (Chinese Premium) names that were bought out last year.  Many of these being longer numerics and 3-5 L/N/C domains in com net and org as well as many new extensions.  My guess is we’ll see massive drops as buyouts won’t hold but the biggest question is what is in store for the most liquid ChiPs like LLL, LLLL, 4N and 5N .com/.net?

Excluding 3 letter .coms, I think the best indicator on how ChiPs are doing overall is to look at the LLLL .coms which have dipped to average trading price around $1100 – $1500 with a few falling just short of the $2k mark. Source That’s a big decline compared to when they were trading at their peak a few months ago for $2500-$3000.  The LLLL .com ChiPs seem to have stopped their descent at the $1k+ mark and I think that’s a good sign.

So, with tons of renewals looming and potential massive drops in the lower end ChiP market (5L .com, 6N – 8N .com, 3-5 letter/number/character names in .xyz, .top, .club, .online, .etc) How do you think the liquid ChiP market will fair in 2016?

How will liquid ChiP domains finish out 2016?

  • Start to gradually increase almost back to 2015 Q4 figures (30%, 14 Votes)
  • Continue to drop but still have more value than similar non-ChiP domains (22%, 10 Votes)
  • Hold steady (22%, 10 Votes)
  • Sink like the Titanic (20%, 9 Votes)
  • Skyrocket! (7%, 3 Votes)

Total Voters: 46

Loading ... Loading ...

Compare cell phone plans and deals | Thanks to Best CD Rates, Conveyancing in London and Registry Software
NameTalent.com Terms of Service and Privacy Policy